Activity Worth: 1 CPD hours

Australasian Podiatry Conference 2017: The effects of heel lifts on lower limb biomechanics: a systematic review - APodC

by Chantel Rabusin1,2, Hylton Menz1,2, Shannon Munteanu1,2, Angela Evans1,2, Jodie McClelland1,3 on Sunday, 24 February 2019 - 7:23am

The Australasian Podiatry Conference 2017 featured an array of great speakers and exemplary papers.

We are pleased to provide here a selection of conference abstracts and invite you to read the abstract and then complete the writing task detailed below.

CPD Activity: Value – 1 hour – Consider category 4 Self-directed Learning under Podiatry Board of Australia Guidelines.  Consider also Category 3 Quality Improvement Activities under the guidelines

 

73 The effects of heel lifts on lower limb biomechanics: a systematic review

Chantel Rabusin1,2, Hylton Menz1,2, Shannon Munteanu1,2, Angela Evans1,2, Jodie McClelland1,3

1La Trobe Sport and Exercise Medicine Centre (LASEM) La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; 2Discipline of Podiatry, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia; 3Discipline of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

Correspondence: Chantel Rabusin

 

Objectives

Heel lifts are often used as a key therapeutic intervention for many musculoskeletal conditions. The mechanisms by which heel lifts exert their effects are poorly understood. This systematic review aims to identify, evaluate and summarise the effects of heel lifts on lower limb biomechanics.

Method

Peer-reviewed studies were searched using electronic databases from inception to June 2016. Studies were included if they (a) were of a cross-sectional or longitudinal study design (b) involved participants without a lower limb discrepancy or neurological condition, (c) evaluated lower limb biomechanics (temporo-spatial, kinematics, kinetics, muscle activity and plantar pressures) during walking or running, and (d) used a heel lift that was removable or an existing feature of a shoe. Methodological quality of included studies was evaluated using a modified version of the Downs and Black Quality Index. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated.

Results

Twenty observational studies investigating the effects of heel lifts on lower limb biomechanics were included. Heel lifts were found to shift centre of pressure posteriorly, decrease maximum ankle joint range of motion, decrease gastrocnemius activity, % swing phase, % single support, % double support when using a heel lift during walking or running in asymptomatic populations.

Conclusions

Heel lifts were found to alter a range of biomechanical parameters, however further research is required to further understand how heel lifts alter lower limb biomechanics during walking and running and to determine if these biomechanical effects translate into improved clinical outcomes.

The task

Read the abstract, then prepare a brief paper (250 – 500 words) in which you explain why the subject matter is important to you. Give your initial response, and then write about the aspect you have chosen to reflect upon. You may wish to relate to your own skills, professional experience or discipline knowledge.

Outline any changes in your understanding and/or behaviour as a result of the experience. What actions may flow from your engagement? Explain the implications for this in your future professional practice. What actions might you take and why?

Don’t forget to upload your completed work to your e-portfolio, citing paper number and title, as evidence of completion.

This abstract can be viewed at the below link.  This abstract is number 73.

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